FAQs

Answers to frequently asked questions


top

Air Temperature (TEMP)

My WeatherHawk air temperature reading is obviously too high. What is the cause and can I repair it?

1. If your WeatherHawk is installed in a location that reflects, or radiates a lot of solar energy as heat; then the sensor may be heating up when ambient temperatures are high and wind speeds are below 2-4 mph. Look at your data records (File-Open Data File-Daily select date) and determine if those conditions are present when the air temperature data seems to be incorrect. If this is the case, there are a few options available to correct, or mitigate the problem.

If the WeatherHawk is mounted on a rooftop, or a very dark surface that absorbs solar energy and radiates it as heat, then confirm that the sensors are at least 8 feet above the mounting surface (ground or rooftop), and that there is a clear path for airflow under the temperature sensor (it’s the small white plastic perforated cylinder on the bottom of the WeatherHawk). If the WeatherHawk is less than 8 feet above the mounting surface, then increase the height and see if this solves the problem. NOTE: Make sure that a guy-wire kit (Model # TP1-GK) is used for all tripods that have more than one extension segment installed.

If the WeatherHawk is 8 feet or more above the mounting surface, and the surface is a black or dark color, then consider installing a lighter colored surface material immediately under the WeatherHawk. Lighter material will reflect solar energy, rather than absorb and radiate it as heat.

If neither of these methods reduces the problem then the problem is site dependent; and you must either accept that the temperature data will be incorrect during low wind speed periods, or consider re-locating the WeatherHawk weather station.

2. The WeatherHawk temperature sensor is a fine wire thermistor. If it fails, the temperature reading will always be at either the maximum or minimum value.

The temperature sensor is manufactured as a replacement assembly and it includes the relative humidity (RH) sensor. It is possible for a user, or local technician to replace a temperature/RH sensor assembly. No system recalibration is required after replacement because the temperature/RH sensor is a precision plug-in component.

A replacement, temperature/RH sensor (P/N 14144) can be ordered on-line under Product Support.

If you prefer to have WeatherHawk replace the sensor, you should box the entire WeatherHawk weather station for shipment, preferably in the original shipping carton. Then contact Weather Hawk Customer Service at 1-866-670-5982, and obtain an RMA number before returning the weather station for evaluation and repair.

top

Barometric Pressure (BP)

My WeatherHawk barometric pressure reading is obviously too high, or too low. What is the cause and can I repair it?

1. Did you input the altitude offset appropriate to the weather station location into VWS software during software set-up? If not, determine the altitude offset for your location by following the instructions in the Quick Start Guide; and then input these offsets into the weather station set-up screen provided by the software.

The most common error is for the user to forget to input the altitude in meters during set-up. The default value is zero, for sea level. The value for altitude must be input in meters, not in feet. The conversion from feet to meters is "feet/3.26".

The next most common error is to input the value in feet instead of meters. This will result in wildly incorrect barometric pressure measurements. The fix is to correct the set-up value to meters using your software. To correct data already in your database use the following formula:

BP(KPa) = BP_measured(KPa) + BP_offset(KPa) + BP_sealevel(KPa)

BP_offset (KPa): input by user, default is zero

BP_sealevel (KPa): calculated from altitude (in meters)

EXAMPLE:

BP_sealevel (KPa)= 101.325*(1-(1-(altitude(m)/44307.69231))^5.25328)
(for Logan UT, elev=1355 m, dP(KPa)=15.254)

2. The barometric pressure sensor is a fully integrated thin film sensor module that incorporates both a sealed vacuum reference cell and temperature compensation. If data is grossly incorrect, or you do not see changes in BP, then the module has probably failed.

The barometric pressure module is not user repairable, or replaceable. Please contact Weather Hawk Customer Service at 1-866-670-5982, and obtain an RMA number before returning your WeatherHawk for repair.

top

Rainfall Measurement Sensor (Rain Gauge)

My WeatherHawk has been installed for a while and it has measured rainfall in the past. For some reason it did not measure rainfall that was reported by other locations.

1. Unfortunately, birds often use rain gauges as nesting or roosting sites, and they can clog a rain gauge with droppings or debris. If your rain gauge is located at ground level, it may have also become infested with ants, or other insects that are attracted to moisture for their nesting sites.

Perform a visual inspection of the rainfall sensor and if it does have debris in the funnel, or insects nesting inside the spoon box, then carefully clean out the debris and make visual inspections a periodic maintenance activity.

2. The largest single source of rainfall measurement error is in nature itself. Rainfall is essentially a relative measurement dependent on a number of factors for accuracy. Clouds that release rain may do so in some areas and not in others. The rainfall that is released in this manner comes from rain “cells”. Rain cells do not usually deposit moisture (rain) evenly across even small areas. It is not uncommon for rain gauges in the same microclimate (a small well defined regional area) to measure different values for rainfall from the same rain event (storm). The best way to validate the proper operation and accuracy of your rainfall sensor is to pour a measured amount of water into it at a fixed rate (100 ml within 5 minutes will equal 20 tips). Do not pour the water into the rain gauge at a faster rate or you may overflow the spoon and lose water between tips, invalidating the test. If you do not feel you can recalibrate, or test your rain gauge, then call Weather Hawk Customer Service at 1-866-670-5982 for consultation, or to obtain an RMA number.

I just installed my WeatherHawk and it doesn’t measure rainfall.

1. It is possible that the tipping spoon in the sensor has been damaged. Gently grasp the base of the rain gauge box to hold it in place, then grasp the rain capture funnel on top of the rain gauge box and pull it off of the sensor. Take care not to pull the entire rain gauge off of the WeatherHawk.

Check that the tipping spoon tips freely and that the holes in the funnel are free of debris. Use your finger to manually tip the spoon a few times and then check to see if a change in rainfall value is displayed. There should be a faint clicking sound when you tip the spoon if the tip counting switch is functioning correctly. If it did not display a change, then the rain gauge switch may have failed, or a wire may be disconnected on the circuit board. Inspect the wiring and repair any obvious problems. If there are no wiring problems, or damaged components, and there is no clicking sound when you tip the sensor spoon, then the tip detection sensor may have failed.

It is possible for a user, or local technician to replace a rainfall sensor. No system recalibration is required after replacement because the rainfall sensor is a calibrated plug-in component. A replacement, pre-calibrated rainfall sensor (P/N 14012) can be ordered on-line under Product Support.

If you prefer to have WeatherHawk replace the sensor, you should box the entire WeatherHawk weather station for shipment, preferably in the original shipping carton. Then contact Weather Hawk Customer Service at 1-866-670-5982, and obtain an RMA number before returning the weather station for evaluation and repair.

top

Relative Humidity

My WeatherHawk RH readings are very low, or always –zero-, when it is obvious that the RH is higher. How is this possible and can it be repaired?

1. A high relative humidity reading may be due to condensation (moisture) on the surface of the sensor. Use a hair dryer to dry the sensor, but do not direct air any hotter than you can stand on your skin over the sensor. Very high temperatures will permanently damage the sensor.

2. The RH module uses a bulk polymer relative humidity sensor. Although this sensor has been designed for use in a wide range of environments (outdoor and indoor), it can still be damaged by airborne contaminants such as high levels of salt spray, chlorine, pesticides, or other chemical sprays. Weather stations that are installed on rooftops are sometimes exposed to soot particles, which will also contaminate the RH sensor. Once contaminated, the sensor readings will degrade and it cannot be repaired.

Contaminated RH sensors must be replaced, and the RH sensor is manufactured as a replacement assembly including the temperature sensor. It is possible for a user, or local technician to replace a temperature/RH sensor assembly. No system recalibration is required after replacement because the temperature/RH sensor is a precision plug-in component. A replacement sensor (P/N 14144) can be ordered on-line under Product Support.

top

Solar Radiation (SR)

I just installed my WeatherHawk and the solar radiation data seems very low. In addition it only changes slightly when the sun is very bright.

1. It is possible that the shipping cap is still covering the sensor. Look at the solar radiation sensor (the gray plastic piece on the top of the WeatherHawk). If it has a red cover on top of the gray sensor body, just pull the red cover off and your WeatherHawk solar radiation reading should immediately increase.

2. If the solar radiation reading is at –zero- , the red cover has been removed, and there is any incident light at all on the sensor top, then the sensor is defective and must be replaced.

It is possible for a user, or local technician to replace a solar radiation sensor. No system recalibration is required after replacement because the solar radiation sensor is itself a calibrated plug-in component. A replacement sensor (P/N 14009) can be ordered on-line under Product Support.

If you prefer to have WeatherHawk replace the sensor, you should box the entire WeatherHawk weather station for shipment, preferably in the original shipping carton. Then contact Weather Hawk Customer Service at 1-866-670-5982, and obtain an RMA number before returning the weather station for evaluation and repair.

top

Wind Speed (WS) and Wind Direction (WD)

My WeatherHawk wind direction and/or wind speed sensors never move, or they only move when the wind speed is very high.

1. If you experience this problem when the air temperature is below freezing it is probable that moisture trapped under the sensor vane, or the cup anemometer is frozen. This will cause the vane to stay in one position, or stop the cups from rotating, until the air temperature rises above 32 deg F (0 deg C).

This is a common problem for mechanical cup-type anemometers (wind speed sensors). One solution has been to make versions of these sensors that incorporate heating elements to melt any ice that may form on the moving parts. This solution is often employed when sensor data is critical to safety, such as at airports, or other public safety locations. Unfortunately, heated sensors are both expensive to manufacture and they require a lot of power for the heater element. Both of these reasons make them impractical for the WeatherHawk system because it is battery powered and value priced.

If the wind direction and wind speed sensors are easy to access, then a temporary fix is to gently grasp the moving parts of the sensor and rotate it throughout its range for a few revolutions or until it spins freely. Even if only one wind sensor appears effected, you might also want to manually rotate the other sensor at the same time to assure it is not freezing in place.

If the sensor is frozen too solid to release with gentle rotational pressure (never force a sensor to rotate), then carefully apply a low level of heat with a hair dryer on its lowest setting. If the heat is too hot for your skin, it is too hot for the sensors. Never directly apply high levels of dry heat, or pour warm water on either of the wind sensors. Direct application of high heat may damage the plastic parts, and water will simply refreeze and lock the sensor(s) again.

2. If you experience this problem when the air temperature is not below freezing then check to see if debris has become entangled in the sensor vane, or rotating cups.

If the sensor vane or cups are clear of debris, then grasp the moving part gently and rotate it through its range. If it rotates freely and without any drag, then the WeatherHawk should be returned for evaluation and repair. If any resistance or roughness is felt the sensor bearings are worn or damaged and the wind sensor must be replaced.

It is possible for a user, or local technician to replace wind sensors. No system recalibration is required after replacement because the wind sensors are calibrated plug-in components. A replacement wind speed sensor (P/N 14010), and/or a wind direction sensor (P/N 14011) can be ordered on-line under Product Support. Unlike integrated wind speed and directions sensors, these sensors are completely independent and can be replaced separately. If one is defective, this does not mean that the other must also be replaced.

If the WeatherHawk must be returned, please contact Weather Hawk Customer Service at 1-866-670-5982, and obtain an RMA number before returning it for evaluation and repair.

My WeatherHawk wind direction is off by a fixed amount.

1. If the sensor is functioning normally, but the reading is “off” by a fixed amount it means that the sensor is not correctly aligned with Magnetic North.

First check to see that the North alignment mark on the wind direction sensor is positioned on the WeatherHawk as it is pictured in the photograph on the Quick Start Guide that you received with WeatherHawk. If this is not the case, then peel the top of the sensor “boot” back over itself to gain access to the sensor mounting screw. Loosen the screw that locks the sensor to the mounting pole just enough to turn it by gently twisting the base of the sensor. Align the mark for Magnetic North and re-tighten the mounting screw. Fold the protective boot back into position. If there are any problems, contact WeatherHawk Customer Service for further instructions on the alignment of this sensor.

If the sensor is firmly fixed and correctly aligned then re-align the WeatherHawk with Magnetic North using a compass. Assure that when you are sighting along the compass that you are at least ten feet from the WeatherHawk tripod, any metal objects, or any large electrical motors. All of these things will cause additional deflection in the compass indicator, resulting in misalignment of the Wind Direction sensor.

My WeatherHawk wind direction always reads 0 degrees.

1. The WeatherHawk wind direction sensor has likely failed internally and it must be replaced.

It is possible for a user, or local technician to replace a wind direction sensor. No system recalibration is required after replacement because the wind speed sensor is itself a calibrated plug-in component. A replacement sensor (P/N 14011) can be ordered on-line under Product Support.

If you prefer to have WeatherHawk replace the sensor, you should box the entire WeatherHawk weather station for shipment, preferably in the original shipping carton. Then contact Weather Hawk Customer Service at 1-866-670-5982, and obtain an RMA number before returning the weather station for evaluation and repair.

top

Communications

My wireless WeatherHawk (WeatherHawk 916, 922, or 240) functions normally sometimes, then mysteriously stops functioning.

Wireless transmission systems are subject to a number of environmental factors that can cause errors in data transmission. This is a normal and usual issue for wireless systems, so WeatherHawk incorporates a data quality protocol that rejects bad data packets. When a bad data packet is rejected, the system resends it until it is accepted. If this happens too often, the system will cease to function until the data transmission quality improves, or the root problem is corrected.

The root problem could either be site or software related. Early versions of Virtual Weather Station (VWS) software had a low tolerance for radio transmission errors, and the software would lock-up at relatively low error levels. Subsequent releases of VWS have corrected this problem, so please make sure you have the latest update for VWS installed on your computer. Go to the Main Menu for VWS, under Help | About Virtual Weather Station and check that your version is V12.06 p08 or later. If you have an earlier version, then download the latest patch, or VWS release here, and follow the installation isntructions

If your software is current, then the problem may be due to a communications breakdown between the station and the base station location; and this could be due to any number of factors. They include new construction in the LOS (Line-of-Sight) path between the system antennas, seasonal growth of foliage in the LOS path, a change in the location of your antenna(s), new siding material on the Host computer house, etc.

Ask yourself the following questions to help to re-qualify your WeatherHawk site.

A. When you lose updates are you getting a message at the top bar of your screen that says "Could not communicate with WeatherHawk"? If so, then the problem is probably not related to the software.

B. Does the loss of updates occur around the same "time" each day (i.e.: 3 pm, 10 pm, 2 am, etc.)? If so, then the system may be operating at the outer limits of the spread spectrum radio range; and when atmospheric conditions change (i.e.: night and day, or very hot and dry versus cool and humid), then the system may break communications with the station.

C. Has there been a change in the LOS path between the weather station site and the base station antenna location? A test would be to move the station to within a few hundred yards of the base station and let it run for a couple of days. If the problem goes away, then it is probably a transmission path problem. There may be too many trees, foliage or other obstructions in the way; or the path may be greater than 1/2 mile; or the walls of the base station building may be absorbing energy due to their construction materials.

If either A & B are the case, then a change in the antenna location or antenna type may solve the problem. Is the antenna attached to a window on the same side of the building as the weather station? If not, and you can do this, it will improve the system radio performance.

If you determine that radio communications is the problem (see A-C above), and relocating the current antenna isn't possible, then contact WeatherHawk Customer Service to discuss antenna options that may improve system performance.

My WeatherHawk is a wireless system (WeatherHawk 916, 922, or 240) and it was functioning normally but it has suddenly stopped sending data.

The first check is to refer to your Quick Start Guide and perform the direct communications tests that you did before installing WeatherHawk. These will re-verify that the WeatherHawk itself is functioning correctly. This involves removing WeatherHawk from the installation site, then directly connecting it to your computer using the serial port and test cable provided with the WeatherHawk. If it functions correctly, remove the cable and attempt to connect using wireless communications while WeatherHawk is near your computer. If the system functions properly at close range, then the radio interference conditions in your area may have changed recently due to the installation of higher powered radio transceivers, heavy foliage growth, or new building construction. You may be able to correct the problem by changing the WeatherHawk radio transmission protocols using the Advanced Radio Set-up proceedure.

The next possibility is that the battery pack has failed, or the battery recharge system is not functioning properly. Follow the instructions below under Power to confirm that these systems are functioning correctly.

It is also possible that your software settings may have been changed by someone else, or your installed version of Virtual Weather Station software has been corrupted. Open the set-up screens for WeatherHawk and confirm that all of the settings are correct. Attempt to download the time and date from WeatherHawk. If all of these actions fail to correct the problem, then reinstall Virtual Weather Station software from the original CD and perform the set-up functions, including the WeatherHawk communications tests. You might also want to update your software with a FREE VWS software download. Verify the applicability of the software patch to your Version of VWS software under "Help - About Virtual Weather Station" before using the patch.

If WeatherHawk fails to communicate during the direct communications tests, the power systems are OK, and the software has been correctly re-installed, then call WeatherHawk Customer Service at 1-866-670-5982, to obtain an RMA number before returning the weather station for evaluation and repair.

My WeatherHawk is directly connected to my computer but it has stopped sending data.

1. First verify that your WeatherHawk has power and is functioning by verifying that the weather station power switch is “on”, and the red LED is flashing every ten (10) seconds (See Quick Start Guide for location of LED).

2. If your system was installed by someone else, and you do not have a clear understanding of data communications systems, you should contact the installer to troubleshoot the system. They may have installed an intermediate data interface system into the wiring between your WeatherHawk and your computer, and something in that system may have failed. There are many possible reasons why this may be the case, so it is best to have the installer do the troubleshooting.

3. If you installed your system and it is a directly connected RS-232 interface, with the cable running across the soil, or traversing a rooftop to reach the Host computer; then the cable may have coupled a transient spike of energy into the WeatherHawk, your computer, or both. These energy spikes can cause permanent damage to electronic equipment. You should troubleshoot the components of the system by substitution to determine the extent of the damage, if any.

To troubleshoot by substitution, disconnect the WeatherHawk and the computer from the connecting cable. Attach another serial device (printer, etc.) to the computer serial port used by WeatherHawk and determine if the serial device will function. If it does, then the computer is OK. If not, then your computer will need to be repaired by a qualified technician.

If the computer is confirmed to be working correctly, bring the WeatherHawk to the computer and connect it using the RS-232 serial cable provided with the WeatherHawk. If WeatherHawk functions correctly, then the problem is with the longer serial cable. Remove it and inspect it for damage, corrosion or deterioration at the connectors, or along its length. Outdoor surface runs of cable are sometimes damaged by rodents (see below). If the WeatherHawk does not function, then call WeatherHawk Customer Service at 1-866-670-5982, to obtain an RMA number before returning the weather station for evaluation and repair.

When your system is functioning again it is suggested that you consider an intermediate data communications interface at the RS-232 connections. An opto-isolated RS-485 interface will effectively isolate energy transients from WeatherHawk and your computer. These communications adapters are available from many home electronics outlets, or from WeatherHawk (P/N 16877), but it may need to be installed by a qualified technician.

top

Lightning

How do I protect my WeatherHawk from the effects of a lightning strike?

1. When your WeatherHawk is initially installed you should take care to provide a proper earth ground connection. There is a ground connection on the bottom of WeatherHawk to which an earth ground wire can be connected.

If the WeatherHawk is installed on a rooftop you should have the ground installed by a qualified electrician. If your WeatherHawk is installed on a ground located concrete pad, or anchored to soil by stakes, you can purchase a grounding kit (P/N 16775) from WeatherHawk and install it yourself. The stakes that hold your WeatherHawk tripod to the soil are not an adequate earth ground connection for the tripod under most conditions. If you are not familiar with what constitutes a proper earth ground you should have your system grounded by a qualified electrician. If you install the ground yourself, it is recommended that you have the installation inspected by a qualified electrician to assure the earth ground is adequate. Very dry soil conditions may require that more than one grounding kit be installed to properly earth ground the system, and a professional can perform the tests required to verify your site earth ground.

A grounding kit should protect your WeatherHawk from energy surges in the air and soil during electrical storms; and it should mitigate the effects of a lightning strike in close proximity to the WeatherHawk installation. However, it is important to recognize that grounding kits will not protect WeatherHawk from the effects of a direct lightning strike.

Under no circumstances should you be in contact with, or stand near a metal pole, or tripod mounted WeatherHawk system during an electrical storm.

top

Power

My WeatherHawk battery is discharged, or doesn’t fully charge even though the sun is shining for several hours each day.

1. The solar panel must be properly oriented towards the sun, and have no obstructions limiting full sunlight. Any coverage of the panel that limits full sunlight will have a significant effect on solar panel efficiency. Verify that the solar panel has been properly installed by reviewing the Installation Manual before taking any further troubleshooting steps.

2. It is also important that the WeatherHawk solar panel is clean and undamaged. Birds also may roost on the edges of solar panels and leave droppings, or damage the cable from the panel to the WeatherHawk.

Visually inspect the panel for debris, bird droppings, or physical damage; then verify that the cable is undamaged. If the panel is clean, and no damage is apparent to the cable or the panel; then disconnect the solar panel connector and inspect it for moisture. After verifying that the connector is dry and clean, measure the voltage between the pins inside the solar panel cable with a multi-meter. The voltage should exceed 17 volts DC (- or + depending on which pin you choose for your meter leads) with full sunlight on the panel, then reconnect the cable to WeatherHawk.

3. If the solar panel is providing a P/N 14159), and it can be ordered on the WeatherHawk web site under Replacement Parts.

To test the battery pack, carefully remove it from the WeatherHawk by removing the seven screws that hold the top and bottom sections together; and then have it tested by a battery supply shop. If the battery is defective it must be replaced and disposed of properly. If you purchase the battery from WeatherHawk, please ship it to us freight prepaid and we will dispose of it at no charge; or you may dispose of the battery locally at an approved hazardous materials disposal location (Call your Fire Department, or Public Works Department for directions). The WeatherHawk battery pack contains lead and under “NO” conditions should it be disposed of in a conventional landfill, or by burning. If the battery pack is not defective, the WeatherHawk will need to be returned to the factory by calling WeatherHawk Customer Service at 1-866-670-5982, and obtaining an RMA number before returning the weather station for evaluation and repair.

top

Solar Radiation Shield

My WeatherHawk doesn't have a solar radiation shield. Isn't that required to get reliable temperature and Relative Humidity readings?

1. Solar radiation shields are always utilized on scientific weather stations costing hundreds, or thousands of dollars more than a WeatherHawk. They are designed to minimize the effects of solar (sun) heating from both direct (the sun is shining directly on the sensor), and reflected (indirect solar energy reflecting off snow, water, light colored soil, etc.) sources.

There are two typical types of solar radiation shield; they are the aspirated and passive (non-aspirated) types. Passive shields often look like a stack of small pie plates, with the temperature and relative humidity sensors located inside them. The most effective solar radiation shields are “aspirated” types, and they come in a variety of shapes and designs. They are called aspirated because air is constantly moved through them by a small fan. This minimizes the build-up of heat inside the shield when there is no wind.

Although many lower cost weather stations use variations on passive shields they do not use aspirated shields because they are expensive to make, and they require a lot of power to run the fan. In general terms, if the wind is above 3 mph, any solar radiation shield will perform as well as the best aspirated shield, if it also adequately protects the sensors from direct and indirect solar radiation.

WeatherHawk has departed from traditional solar radiation shield design by using an ultra low thermal mass, fine wire, quick response thermistor located in the air stream. The temperature and relative humidity sensors are engineered into the lower surface of the weather station main body in a way that minimizes the effects of enclosure thermal mass and solar energy, and maximizes the effect of ambient wind conditions. This innovative approach to sensor design has eliminated the pie plate sensor enclosure that usually hangs on a weather station, yet WeatherHawk maintains acceptable temperature and relative humidity sensor response and accuracy.

top

Wild Birds and Rodents

The WeatherHawk is often the highest point in a region and this makes it an attractive landing site for wild birds.

1. Small birds may use it as a roost, or as a refuge from ground predators. Predator birds (Hawks, Falcons, Owls, etc.) may use it as a favored “hunting” roost. Various sensors on top of WeatherHawk may be either damaged or affected by the presence of wild birds:

  • Wind sensors may be broken or not give a correct reading when birds are roosting on the WeatherHawk.
  • The rain gauge may become contaminated by droppings or other bird debris (see rain gauge sensor above).

To discourage birds from landing on your WeatherHawk you might consider a product called “Bird Spikes”. This product is available from many commercial sources including boat yards, industrial catalogs or industrial supply outlets. Bird spikes are a non-lethal bird control item used on building ledges and other horizontal surfaces. They are a series of small crossed wire spikes (1-4” tall), and when properly installed they are an effective, small area bird control device. Bird spikes are purchased in strips that can be cut to length and adhered to the top of WeatherHawk. When you install these spikes make sure that they do not impede free movement of the wind sensors, or significantly interrupt airflow over the top of WeatherHawk.

2. Rodents (rats, mice, gophers, squirrels, etc.) seem to have a “taste” for cable insulation, and they often seem to choose cables that conduct electrical energy. They may choose to gnaw on the cable from the solar panel to WeatherHawk, or on the data communications connection from the WeatherHawk to the computer (for RS-232/485 directly connected systems). Control techniques involve either altering the taste of the cable insulation, or “armoring” the cables. Armoring is easily accomplished using automotive plastic cable spiral wraps, or putting the longer cable runs into inexpensive PVC plastic pipe for both exposed, and buried outdoor sections (TIP: For exposed outdoor runs of PVC pipe you should use UV stabilized pipe, or it may become very brittle within a few months). For short cable runs, the taste of insulation can be altered by wiping the cables with concentrated Tabasco or Habanero pepper sauce, allowing it to dry, then spraying the cable with a light coat of clear lacquer; or alternatively by applying a petroleum based automotive grease.

Any one, or a combination of these methods have been effective depending on the length of the cable run, the pest involved and the local conditions.

 

WeatherHawk Newsletter

The WeatherHawk newsletter provides new product information, technical tips, and case studies related to our line of weather monitoring products.

Subscribe to the newsletter
Unsubscribe from the newsletter
Email Address